The Woodpecker Network

GreenWoodpecker.jpg

We’ve had a great response to our appeal with well over 50 Lesser Spotted Woodpecker sites reported so far.
At a few sites the birds have been seen excavating a nest cavity, but the majority are areas where calling and drumming birds have been found.
We appreciate that it is a bit of a challenge but now is the time to try to pin down the nest sites. Pairs will be concentrating their activity near their potential nest site and cavity excavation will start in earnest now. Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers lay their first eggs from mid-April until early May so the cavity will need to be complete quite soon.

It has been a great two weeks for finding Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers. The weather has been reasonably calm and warm (at least in the south) and, for Lesser Spots, the birds have been drumming and calling reliably.

Rob Clements was searching an area of the New Forest north east of Lyndhurst on Friday and reports that Lesser Spots were very active between 8-9 am, with lots of drumming involving 4-5 birds. Nigel Owen saw a pair chasing at another site in the Forest at 9.15 am.

Thanks to all of you who have already been in touch. We have had reports of sightings and drumming from the New Forest, North London and Lincolnshire already.

February and March is the best time to find breeding territories by visiting likely sites and listening for calling and drumming. Once they have settled on a nest site by mid-April they are very inconspicuous and secretive until they are feeding young in late May.

Great Spots are found widely throughout Britain, they are common in woodland and readily visit garden feeders. Lesser Spots are scarce and rarely seen. So you are much more likely to see a Great Spot than a Lesser Spot.

You can easily tell the difference………..

LSW TimPreston 256Lesser Spotted Woodpecker © Tim Preston

© 2016-2018 The Woodpecker Network

Website design and build by Garganey Consulting